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M.BNMG | Mario Bonamigo - Stylish Store in Bassano del Grappa

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VORTEX is a personal project by Tim Sessler, shot on the iPhone 8 and Freefly MoVI. Filmed within 48h in NYC.


Developed and named after the sandstone outcropping it’s plotting upon, this 750 square foot cabin situated in Alberta’s Carraig Ridge is the first home to be built in the surrounding area. Meaning, that in addition to some fine amenities and a well-designed retreat home, you’ll enjoy complete and utter privacy in this true-blue wilderness cabin. Dubbed the Rock House, the project was conceived and built by award-winning architect James Cutler of Cutler Anderson Architects. Additionally, the bungalow-style home boasts a full basement, is almost entirely enveloped in glass resulting in outstanding panoramic views of the countryside, and a toasty fireplace to keep warm during those cold Canadian winter retreats.

Field of Vision - Graven Image

Using over 100 years of archival footage, director Sierra Pettengill explores the history of the largest Confederate monument, Georgia’s Stone Mountain. __ Directed by Sierra Pettengill

How Stanislavski Reinvented the Craft of Acting

In the 1950s, a wave of “method actors” took Hollywood by storm. Actors like James Dean, Marlon Brando, and Montgomery Clift, brought a whole new toolset and perspective on the actor’s craft to the films they performed in. The foundation of their work, however, was laid in Russia more than fifty years prior to their stardom. Stanislavski’s conception of “psychological realism” in performance challenged ideas about the essential features of the actor’s craft that had been held for centuries. In theatre before Stanislavski, acting was defined as a craft of vocal and gestural training. The role the actor played was to give life to the emotions of the text in a broad illustrative fashion. Formal categories such as melodrama, opera, vaudeville, and musicals, all played to this notion of the actor as chief representer of dramatic ideas. Stanislavski’s key insight was in seeing the actor as an experiencer of authentic emotional moments. Suddenly the craft of performance could be about seeking out a genuine internal experience of the narrative’s emotional journey. From this foundation, realism in performance began to flourish. This not only changed our fundamental idea of the actor but invited a reinvention of the whole endeavor of telling stories through drama. Teachers would adopt Stanisvlaski’s methods and ideas and elaborate upon them in American theatre schools. The result, in the 1950s, would be a new wave of actors and a style of acting that emphasized psychological realism to a greater degree than their peers in motion pictures. This idea of realism grew to dominate our notion of successful performances in cinema. Stanislavskian-realism is now central to the DNA of how we direct and read performances, whether we are conscious of it or not. I think it is important to know this history and consider its revolutionary character. Understanding the nature of Stanislavski’s insights allows us to look at other unasked questions, other foundational elements of our craft that we might take for granted. — Stanislavski’s books are still fascinating explorations of the craft of performance.


There is almost no way in which living under a bridge could be construed as a good thing. Almost. Just take a look at this Underpass Studio by Fernando Abellanas and you’ll see what we mean. This tiny studio located in a secret spot somewhere in Valencia, Spain is brilliant, but simple. The wooden platform that makes up the largest portion of the studio hangs by a steel frame that grips a concrete lip under the bridge. That platform uses a hand crank to move from side to side – and transports the sole user from the bank right under the bridge to the column where the shelves and desk have been installed. Once the Spanish furniture maker who built all of this gets onto the platform and operates the crank, he makes his little space inaccessible to anyone but himself. Much like a treehouse, this hideaway has a whimsical, freeing sense to it.
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